Ranting about perfection

I’ve always been driven. Even as a kid, I always tried harder. The problem isn’t that I need to try harder, the problem is that I want perfection. I stare at the scene I’ve written and shake my head in despair. Absolute garbage! Delete button, here I go.

I found this article by Joe Bunting titled The Myth of Perfection on The Write Practice. It was actually really helpful because he starts by saying: you’re never going to be perfect. For me, that was great news because it set me free. I can accept it and try to do a good job, not a perfect job.

When I look forward, I get overwhelmed. I think of the odds against me and they seem insurmountable. It helps if I look back. Once, I didn’t speak English. I wrote and didn’t believe I’d ever get published. I’ve written a book, I have another on the works.

Maybe I need to embrace Good Enough and kick Perfection in the butt.

calvin-and-hobbes-2

Write first, promote second

I just read an interview of Barbara Freethy where she mentions that the trick to her success was to write first, promote second. I thought it was excellent advice.

http://selfpublishingadvice.org/blog/how-i-do-it-super-successful-indie-authors-share-their-secrets-this-week-barbara-freethy/

Like a lot of new indie authors, I started to try to promote my book on social media and quickly found out promoting can take a life of its own. Online parties, giveaways, blog tours, interviews…the list of things to do goes on and on. As well, you have to keep your presence in your chosen social mediums felt: google+, Facebook, etc. That takes time. Time that I could have used to write.

It becomes a chicken-and-egg thing. If you don’t promote, you don’t sell books. If you promote, you don’t have time to write. If you don’t write, you don’t have any books to sell. So, which should be the number one priority?

Barbara argues that keeping writing as the priority is the key to her success. She goes on to add this as advice for new writers. Like myself. Now, since I’m new and success is (hopefully) coming, I don’t yet know what will work for me. What do I give my time to writing or promoting? Making that decision was actually a matter of honesty for me.

I asked myself: If I knew for a fact that not one would read my books, would I still write? It took me a long time to answer because I really wanted to be honest answer and it was painful to be honest. But, because I was honest, I found a very powerful answer.

I would write if no one ever read a single word I’d written. I would write because, when it’s all said and done, I love the writing itself. Selling books is great, but that’s gravy. For me, the key, the gold, is writing. So, for me, my motto is write first, promote second. Only time will tell if it works.

And, just in case you don’t agree with my self-inspiring, little rant, here are some articles that say the exact opposite. 🙂

http://www.thebookdesigner.com/marketing-your-book/

http://www.pamperrypr.com/25-tested-marketing-tips-for-self-published-authors/

http://www.bidinotto.com/2013/03/10-winning-marketing-strategies-for-your-self-published-book/