Ranting about perfection

I’ve always been driven. Even as a kid, I always tried harder. The problem isn’t that I need to try harder, the problem is that I want perfection. I stare at the scene I’ve written and shake my head in despair. Absolute garbage! Delete button, here I go.

I found this article by Joe Bunting titled The Myth of Perfection on The Write Practice. It was actually really helpful because he starts by saying: you’re never going to be perfect. For me, that was great news because it set me free. I can accept it and try to do a good job, not a perfect job.

When I look forward, I get overwhelmed. I think of the odds against me and they seem insurmountable. It helps if I look back. Once, I didn’t speak English. I wrote and didn’t believe I’d ever get published. I’ve written a book, I have another on the works.

Maybe I need to embrace Good Enough and kick Perfection in the butt.

calvin-and-hobbes-2

The perfect man

Is there such a thing as a realistic romance hero?

I have to admit I’ve read a book or two where the hero drove me crazy. He was just…sooo nice. Maybe I’m a sceptic but I think real men have issues and can be nice but can also have days where they’re not so nice–just like us gals. These guys were so nice they’d put Santa Claus out of business.

What’s up with romance and the perfect hero? I read somewhere that the recipe for a good romance was an imperfect heroine and a blemish-free hero. She could have any issues, imperfections or range of personalities but he had to fall madly in love with her at first sight and had to be perfect–with a capital P.

Really? Do women really buy that?

I’m not asking for a wife abuser or a grump. I just wonder if a less-than perfect hero wouldn’t make a wonderful lead in a romance. I wonder, would women not like him because he had his faults? I think we would.

Take Beauty and the Beast. He’s a wonderful catch…if you don’t mind a little hair and we won’t mention the growling or his anger-issues with furniture. Or what about Star Wars? Han Solo made more than one woman’s heart beat a little faster but he didn’t exactly have a clean record.

I say imperfection is what makes our heroes interesting and charming. I’m not suggesting we take Hannibal Lecter as our role model, but we don’t have to have a perfect angel as it either. Perfection is incredibly boring.

(credit:The Silence Of The Lambs Wiki - Wikia)

(credit:The Silence Of The Lambs Wiki – Wikia)