Review: Fools Rush In

Fools Rush In is the first book I’ve ever read from Kristan Higgins and you might wonder what hole I’ve been living in because she’s quite a well known author and has more than a few titles to her name. Nevertheless, this one was my first. Still, this won’t be my last read of hers. The book was awesome.

The story has a set up that I loved immediately. Millie Barnes is a doctor coming back home to a small sea-side town. She has her own little house, a wonderful job and is trying to get in shape. She even adopts a friendly doggie from the pound. I adored her. Even better, she’s funny and her humour kept me glued to the book.

Now Millie is a dear but she’s blind as a bat because she’s determined to get a former crush of hers to fall in love with her no matter what and she won’t see reason. Meanwhile, the reader knows that the right guy for her is Sam, the police officer who’s just a sweetie and good-looking to boot but Millie just keeps trying, poor thing.

I had a wonderful time reading this one. It’s written in the first person which feels both intimate and funny. The writing is light with subtle references to TV that ground it and the love story is beautiful. Due to our heroine’s blindness, the attraction between Millie and Sam grows slowly. I didn’t mind that. I thought it felt organic and natural.

If you enjoy contemporary romance with a dash of humour, this one is a great read. A lot like Rachel Gibson or Susan Elizabeth Phillips with the laughter and light dialogue, Kristan Higgins delivered a great story with fantastic characters that made a great read.

(credit: kristanhiggins.com)

(credit: kristanhiggins.com)

Note: click on cover to go to site.

Review: Virgin River

Virgin River was the first book from Robyn Carr that I’ve ever read. It’s the beginning of the series of the same name and I was pretty taken just with the set up. The writing didn’t disappoint.

Virgin River is the story of Melinda; a nurse who grieving the loss of her husband. She moves to the tiny town of Virgin River to try and start over. The move, for someone who’s coming from the big city, is a complete culture shock and, of course, she ends up in a run-down cabin with a suitcase full of impractical, expensive boots.

Our hero is Jack Sheridan who runs the local hang-out/restaurant. He’s a former marine who moved to the small town to find peace and calm after several tours of duty. He’s tough, protective and a really good guy.

I loved the set up from the get go. I foresaw all sorts of small-town shocking adjustments and looked forward to each one. I liked Melinda who had integrity and values she defended. I liked Jack who was kind and protective. Most of all, I liked how the book took its time moving things along. I make up that one doesn’t get over someone they love and move onto a new relationship quickly. This story gave Melinda’s mourning time. She develops feelings for Jack cautiously and slowly, all the while wondering where she fits and if she should stay.

There are a ton of fun, quirky characters in the story and realistic turns of events that kept me interested and kept the book from feeling too ‘nice’. So, I would highly recommend it. Robyn Carr writes a beautiful love story in a gentle, romantic way that doesn’t shock or scare the reader. Even better, it’s only the first in a series, so you know you have lots of great reading ahead.

(credit: robyncarr.com)

(credit: robyncarr.com)

Note: click on cover to go to site.

Trying out new things

I’m trying out new authors…well, new to me. A friend recommended Karen Rose and another recommended Robyn Carr, so I thought I’ll check them out.

Now, I think I might have mentioned I’m a bit of a scary cat. Well, Karen Rose took that fear to a complete new level…and that was just by reading the cover. Since she’s a romance author and highly recommended, I’m going to grit my teeth and give her book 100%…though I might have to hug my doggies while I turn the pages. I’ll definitely let you know how that goes.

Robyn Carr is sweet, contemporary romance and I’m super excited to read her book. The premise of this story is one I just adore so I’ve been stealing moments here and there to read. I’ll let you know what I thought and rant on and on about the entire thing.

Someone else also recommended Catherine Anderson. She too writes contemporary romance. I just haven’t got my paws on one of her books. Obviously, an emergency trip to the used book store is in order.

All this means that, after reading these, I could find a new beloved author…and that’s just amazing. I can’t thank my friends enough for sending me to Karen Rose, Catherine Anderson and Robyn Carr. Even if they don’t tickle my fancy, a recommendation is a gift full of good wishes and that in itself is awesome. If I do find a new great author, I’ll be over the moon.

(credit: gentlemenofsport.com)

(credit: gentlemenofsport.com)

What about you? Do you have any favourite romance authors you’d like to share? 😀

Internet woes

I had arranged for the Wi-fi guy to arrive the very day we moved so we wouldn’t be without our beloved internet for even one night but, as luck would have it, the guy didn’t show up until the following week. For five days, we had no TV, no cell phone service and no Wi-Fi.

It got ugly.

(credit:giphy.com)

(credit:giphy.com)

Now, I have lived without them before. When I was a teen there was no internet and, back further, I can remember days when TV meant only a couple of channels. I know what it’s like to not have these luxuries. I also remember driving around in Europe in a car without seat belts. My point is, I like these things. They make me happy.

(credit: pixgood.com)

(credit: pixgood.com)

Things seem so much easier now that we have Wi-Fi, cells and roughly a million TV channels. How did we manage to do research before the internet? How did we share gossip? It seems like the internet is necessary for just about everything. These five days, I felt completely cut off without it.

When the guy showed up to connect us, I was beyond desperate to see him.

Buuuuut…I was also deep in a book.

So, I ignored the sound of the bell and let my hubby answer the door.

(credit:quirky bookworm.com)

(credit:quirky bookworm.com)

 

 

Review: Stolen

I had to read Stolen. Bitten was so good, it left me wanting more.

Stolen is the second book in the Otherworld series. It has Elena and Clayton, our heroes from the former book, but it also introduces other characters and villains.  It continues where the other left off, which delighted me, but puts Elena in a fix, which worried me.

Stolen opens the Otherworld series wide. There are witches here and vampires and demons and shamans and every other creature you could think of. That didn’t bother me but Elena gets kidnapped and is stuck deep underground by a group of nasty scientist-like villains and that worried me. A lot. There’s something about mad geniuses doing experiments that scares me silly.

Before you get all antsy, I’ll let you know that things turn out okay. Elena rules the day, Clayton is awesome still and they come out winners, even manage to make a few new friends on the way. Still, I bit my nails to the quick.

Kelley Armstrong delivers another great read with Stolen. The reading is fluid and magnetic. Elena and Clayton are as inspiring as they were the first time around. There is humour sprinkled in that made me adore the book and though there were some terrifying moments, I think most readers won’t be as antsy as I am and they’d love this book. So, if you’re a fan of romance, or like a mystery or drama or even like a bit of a rush, this book is for you. Don’t panic if you haven’t read the first, this one does a great job of covering the basis and introducing you to the Otherworld series. I’d highly recommend it.

(credit: teabookslove.blogspot.com)

(credit: teabookslove.blogspot.com)

Note: click on cover to go to site.

Monday Morsel: Stolen

Monday Morsel is a little twist I put on the bookish meme Teaser Tuesdays hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. It works just like Teaser Tuesdays…except it’s on Monday. 🙂

Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other Monday Morsel participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

“”Binding spells?” I said, flexing my still-numb hands.

“Witchcraft,” Ruth said. “But I’m sure you figured that out.” Pg. 21 from Stolen.

(credit: teabookslove.blogspot.com)

(credit: teabookslove.blogspot.com)

Note: click on cover to go to site.

Monday Morsel: Bitten

Monday Morsel is a little twist I put on the bookish meme Teaser Tuesdays hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. It works just like Teaser Tuesdays…except it’s on Monday. 🙂

Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other Monday Morsel participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

“I have to run under the cover of night and I have to do it alone. There is no compromise.” Pg.12 from Bitten by Kelley Armstrong.

(credit:abookwormshaven.com)

(credit:abookwormshaven.com)

Note: click on cover to go to site.

The 4 horrors of book-lending

Today, someone at DayJob commented on how much they’d like to try a book by Linda Howard.

Then, they pointedly looked at the book in my hands (by Linda Howard) and asked if I was done with it.

I was done alright. But I wasn’t letting that book out of my hands. Not only is Linda Howard one of my favourite authors, I’ve lent out books in the past and horrible things have happened.

Allow me to explain the insufferable horrors and my reactions.

HORROR #1.

They broke the spine or tore pages.

I read my books and hold them like cherished babies. Nothing gets folded or disrupted. If people break any part of them from the spine to the pages, I cry.

Reaction: I cursed all their ancestors and wished they were geckos.

HORROR #2.

They spilled something on it.

I don’t care if it’s water (and it usually isn’t). People have returned books after spilling coffee, gum or some strange, sticky substance among the pages.

Reaction: I cursed all their ancestors and wished they were geckos.

HORROR #3.

They lost it or ‘lent’ it to someone else.

With or without apologies, the bottom line is my book is gone and I have a hole in my heart.

Reaction:  I cursed all their ancestors and wished they were geckos.

HORROR #4.

They wrote in it.

I don’t care if someone thinks they’re Plato with the insight to move millions or if they saw an ‘editing’ mistake and had to fix it. I don’t want their writing in my book.

Reaction: I cursed all their ancestors and wished they were geckos.

 

After experiencing all 4 of these horrors, I’ve resorted to not lending out books. Ever. I keep them in their shelves, neatly and carefully organized by genre. Not a page out of place.

I like to think they’re happy. More importantly, so am I.

And so are the geckos.

leopard-gecko-cute

 

Great books, terrible movies

I was just watching a bit of Breaking Dawn on TV. It’s been four years since the movie hit theatres and I had almost forgotten the movie. The two seconds I saw made me sigh. Why didn’t they capture the feel of the book?

Hollywood has the ability to create amazing movies. And there are incredible books out there. Why can’t those two winning combinations create an even better result?

Time after time, I’ve gone into the movie theatre and come out disappointed. I know I’m not alone. As Adam Holmes aptly explains in his great post, “I’m talking about movies where, having seen them, you have to re-read the book as quickly as possible just to assure yourself that the original story was actually good.”

I too go back to the books and unfailingly fall back in love but my frustration doesn’t abate. Why can’t the genuine, honest talent translate from the page to the screen?

 has a theory in his post Great Book, Bad Movie. He says: “The answer is simple, but it has complex implications: Novels are long, but movies are short. It’s impossible to encapsulate the tonal shifts of a book like Revolutionary Road  in a feature-length film, no matter how long those two hours feel.

“The movie replaces character with plot, and the result lands with a wet flop.”

Is that it? Is the movie too short? Can no film ever live up to the book’s great triumph?

But I can think of some successes. What about The Godfather? Or Lord of the Rings or Forrest Gump or Jaws or The Silence of the Lambs? Those were all amazing movies and they were made out of great books.

But maybe none of this matters. Idiotic or loyal, if I see a movie made out of a book I’ve read, I’m going. I won’t care if it has received bad reviews or good ones. I’m going to see how those characters I loved did and how the story that so enthralled me has come to life.

Then, if the movie doesn’t live up to my expectations, I’ll moan and grumble and curse…

baby,black,and,white,girl,grumpy-28877d0fa958daf80bf706450ae8747e_h

Until the next time a book becomes a movie.

HPSet1_store