Daydreaming

Winter Bayne posted this great letter on a post in reference to the famous quote, “To be or not to be, that is the question.”

“Dear Mr. Hamlet,

I can answer your question. It is absolutely with out a doubt not to be. That’s passive voice.

Regards,
Winter”

I thought her letter was hilarious (she has a wicked sense of humour) but I also thought it was full of imagination. I thought, ‘I bet Winter daydreamed as a child’.

I spent most of my childhood living in worlds I had created–to the despair of my parents and teachers who often told me to come back from the clouds. Daydreaming used to have such a bad rep, but it’s changing.

Psychology Today said in this post that daydreaming is now seen in a much more positive light.

Over the past decade, scientists have begun taking a second look at daydreaming and have discovered surprising benefits to letting go of the present moment. What’s becoming clear is that daydreaming—a mental activity historically viewed merely as a lapse in attention—can bring about the very outcomes that cognitive scientists have long thought to be the main province of perception and cognitive control. Studies now show that the cost of short-shrifting our inner lives is high: We ignore our daydreams to the detriment of optimal learning, creativity, and well-being.”

Today, my daydreams transform my writing. They give me ideas and are responsible for the annax world where my books take place.

When I read something like Winter’s letter, I get excited because, like my daydreams, it fuels my imagination.

She wrote that letter to Hamlet. What else can she do? What else can we do? Ah…the possibilities.

Daydreaming_(1)

10 thoughts on “Daydreaming

  1. I day dream all the time. Still. However, I also had countless imaginary friends, most of which were my favorite characters in books. I think that’s why I like writing so much. I get to put my daydreams down for others to read! 🙂

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